Photo-impressions: River Liffey, Dublin

Here are some photographic impressions of a new symbol of Dublin, the Samuel Beckett Bridge.

The bridge exists to provide a link between the newly redeveloped Dockland areas to north and south of the river Liffey.

From the first time I saw it, I was very impressed with it. Its graceful, sweeping shape looks very pleasing. The supporting cables are eye-catching and I thought reminded me of something. Later I realised what it was: the harp, prime symbol of Ireland that can be seen on coins, government buildings and Ryanair planes.

Here are some notes and technical information on the photographs

Samuel Beckett Bridge at night

Samuel Beckett Bridge at night

This is a composite of two overlapping photographs. I rested the camera on a concrete post on the riverside and aimed the camera towards the left side of the bridge then the right. I merged the two in Photoshop. The shutter speed was half a second, that’s five stops below the standard shutter speed of 1/60th of a second. The aperture is f/8, one stop above the standard of f/5.6 and the ISO was 800, two stops faster than 200. So the overall light level in this photo is minus six. That’s exactly what we would expect for a night scene

Samuel Beckett Bridge looking from south to north

Samuel Beckett Bridge looking from south to north

This is a composite panoramic photo consisting of three overlapping images. I merged them in Photoshop Photomerge. The camera settings were 1/320s f/10.0 and ISO100. Going from the standard settings, these settings are plus two and two thirds, plus one and two thirds and minus one, respectively. The light level is therefore plus three, which is typical for a scene lit by bright sunshine. The angle emphasises the width and unique triangular form of the bridge, seen from this angle.

The Samuel Beckett Bridge seen from the west

The Samuel Beckett Bridge seen from the west

Looking east along the river Liffey through the Samuel Beckett Bridge towards the twin chimneys of Ringsend power station. Camera settings 1/250s f/9.0 ISO100. Plus two, plus one and a third and minus one respectively, the overall light level is plus two and one third, typical of a daytime scene in bright sunshine.

The Samual Beckett Bridge in 2009 shortly after delivery from Rotterdam

The Samual Beckett Bridge on 5 June 2009 shortly after delivery from Rotterdam


Camera settings are: 1/250s f/8.0 ISO100 plus two, plus one and minus one respectively. Overall light level is plus one. This photo was taken six and a half years before the photos above from a similar viewpoint. The bridge is about to be placed in its permanent position. There is smoke coming out of the chimneys of the power station. Since then the chimneys are no longer in use but have been allowed to stand as they are a such a familiar symbol of Dublin.

View of the Port of Dublin in 2006 prior to the appearance of the Samuel Beckett Bridge

View of the Port of Dublin in 2006 prior to the appearance of the Samuel Beckett Bridge


Camera settings 1/30s f/7.1 ISO800(estimatd) The camera was the Nikon D100, capture date 1 November 2006. The ISO wasn’t recorded but I would estimate it to be around 800, so the overall light level is minus three and two thirds. This moody and atmospheric view was taken from the ferry from Holyhead as it was about to dock in Dublin.

If you’re interested in finding out more about my very useful approach to camera exposure, why not come on one of my photo walks or book a one to one session.

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Greater Manchester’s forgotten bridges revealed

EYEWITNESS 2015 blog by Aidan O'Rourke

Partially uncovered Hanging Bridge next to Manchester Cathedral

Partially uncovered Hanging Bridge next to Manchester Cathedral


 Here’s my feature on forgotten bridges which have been uncovered and restored or will soon be. I’ve always been fascinated by bridges. They have an aesthetic quality, they’re also historic and tell us so much about geography. Many bridges are buried under layers of development. A few have been uncovered and will see the light of day again.

We take old bridges for granted. Often we don’t even notice we are crossing them. Many lie buried and forgotten, but a few are being rediscovered. In Stockport, the 19th century Lancashire Bridge reappeared after many years. A section of the covering was cut away to reveal the bridge and river below. A similar project is in progress in Rochdale. The bridge remained out of sight from 1824 until last year. As part of the ‘Revealing the Roch’ project, the surface layer has been removed to reveal the river Roch and bridge underneath. I find it fascinating as it transforms the town by going back in time. In Manchester city centre, part of the medieval Hanging Bridge was revealed in the late 90s. It’s part of the Cathedral visitors centre. And down on the Irwell, one of Manchester’s oldest and most significant bridges has been partially hidden for over a century. It’s the Stephenson Bridge built in 1830 for the Manchester to Liverpool railway. The Ordsall Chord will have an impact on the Grade 1 listed bridge on the Manchester side but the works will also cause part of it to be exposed, a ‘consolation prize’ or ‘extra benefit’ depending on your viewpoint. Discover Manchester city centre on one of my photographic walking tours, £25 for MEN readers. More info on www.aidan.co.uk

Lancashire Bridge, Stockport, uncovered in 2014.

Lancashire Bridge, Stockport, uncovered in 2014.


 
Rochdale Bridge and River Roch

Rochdale Bridge was uncovered in 2015 as part of the ‘Revealing the Roch’ project


 
Princes Bridge and Stephenson Bridge

Princes Bridge (left) and hidden in shadow, the 1830 Stephenson Bridge.

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